5 Considerations for Creating Standout Mail Pieces

When we think about great direct mail results, we tend to think about the list, the message, and the call to action. However, things like the size, shape, and texture of the piece play a key role, too. Let’s look at five considerations for creating standout mail pieces.

  1. Trim size. If you want the lowest possible postage cost, go with a standard 3.5 x 5” postcard. Choosing a nonstandard size will cost more in postage, but it will make your postcard stand out. “Why is that one different?” the recipient wants to know. It might even be the first piece they pick up. What’s that worth?
  2. Weight. Consumers tend to associate the weight of the stock used in the mailing with the quality of the brand and, by extension, the product being marketed. Heavier weight stocks command respect and attention.
  3. Texture. In a sea of smooth envelopes, mailers with textured finishes get noticed. From high gloss and spot varnish to specialty processes, there are lots of options to choose from.
  4. Personalization. Even the use of someone’s name on the front of a card will engage the recipient more than a static card. This engagement might only last for an extra fraction of a second, but sometimes, that is all you need.
  5. Color. Why use a standard white background when you can pick from a range of vibrant colors? Use knock out type, graphics, and images on dynamic backgrounds to get your mailer to jump out of the box. If you carry in a sea of white envelopes and one bright red one, which one would you pick out first?

There are lots of ways to get your direct mailer to stand out from all of the others. Why not try something you have not tried before? You just might love the results!

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s